Welcome to Power Lincoln Locally

solar1Most Nebraska communities agree that renewable energy is an important part of their future. But, has your community really assessed its local renewable energy potential?  Are solar and other forms of renewable energy addressed in your comprehensive plan, and is energy one of your economic development priorities? What standards does your community use to balance between productive renewable energy resources and protecting community character?

Lincoln is poised to develop local clean energy

Did you know that as a Lincoln Electric Systems (LES) customer-owner, you get almost all of your electricity from dirty, coal-fired power plants?

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The LES portfolio is at least 70 percent coal and can be more depending on the content of wholesale market purchases. Only 9 percent of LES electricity comes from renewables (including hydro), 4 percent from oil and gas. LES has the greatest reliance on coal of any of the three major public power districts in Nebraska, and is double the national average of 42 percent coal powered. By comparison, OPPD has a generation mix of 57.8 percent coal, 14.9 percent nuclear power, 26.9 percent oil and natural gas and 0.2 percent landfill gas and wind (this was before announced 400MW of wind). NPPD has a generation mix of 44-54 percent coal, 36 percent nuclear, 8 percent hydro, 4 percent wind, and 1 percent gas and oil. Currently, LES purchases power from a number of coal-fired plants. These coal plants typically burn Wyoming coal, sending millions of Nebraska dollars to Wyoming and international coal companies. Such a heavy reliance on such a polluting fuel leaves Lincoln at risk. With recent regulatory changes, many coal plants will spend millions – even billions of dollars to update aging plants that pose significant air, water, and public health risks. LES will pass these costs on to us, LES customers.

Every Nebraska community has a solar energy resource.  Solar installation costs are rapidly coming down, and solar energy systems are coming soon to your community. But most local governments have little experience with renewable energy from a land use or economic development perspective. The Power Lincoln Locally effort will address the rapidly evolving world of community-scale solar and locally-based renewable energy potential for our community and advocate for a more modern, economically feasible, and cleaner energy plan for the Lincoln community.

 

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Power Lincoln Locally Goals

  •  Support a large clean energy plan
  • Develop an incentive based solar program to help Lincoln stakeholders develop their solar energy resource in an economically feasible way
  • Educate the public on local solar and renewable energy potential
  • Address growing electrical capacity needs with locally-produced renewable energy
  • Replace load from the aging Sheldon Station coal-fired plant and identify expensive costs associated with purchases from other coal-fired plants
  • Create local ownership and economic development opportunities for Lincoln citizens, businesses and institutions
  • Help modernize Lincoln with a clean energy base that will help attract business, young people, and others here for years to come
  • Create a clean energy model that will serve as an example for other midwestern cities